Trading Conflict for Development – Regional Approaches to Linking Global Mineral Supply Chains to Local Development

Workshop Session 1
October 6, 16:30 – 18:00, Venue: Umweltforum/Seminar 10
Language: English

Organisers

Henri Pierre Gebauer, Head of Component, Support Program to the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR)

Mark Mattner, Project Director, Regional Resource Governance in Fragile States of West Africa

 
Speakers

Hannah Koep-Andrieu, Policy Adviser Extractives, Responsible Business Conduct Unit, OECD

Prof. Gavin Hilson, Chair of Sustainability in Business, University of Surrey

Henri Pierre Gebauer, Head of Component, Support Program to the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR), GIZ

 
Moderator

Mark Mattner, Head of Program, Regional Resource Governance in Fragile States of West Africa, GIZ

 
Objective
The overall objective of the workshop is to discuss the relevance of regional approaches to fighting the illegal exploitation and trade of natural resources and promoting governance reforms in the mining sector. The participants will identify how the implementation of key tools and instruments such as mineral certification schemes (ICGLR Regional Certification Mechanism, Kimberley Process), international transparency initiatives (EITI), mandatory legal requirements (proposed EU regulation, US Dodd-Frank Act) and voluntary approaches (OECD Due Dilligence Guidelines) can be complemented and enhanced through regional cooperation.

Relevance to the sector day’s key topic
High value minerals such as gold, diamonds and 3T (tin, tantalum, tungsten) are in high demand on global markets and enter global supply chains as they are utilized for manufacturing consumer products, jewelry and for other applications. They have also long been associated with violent conflict, corruption and under-development in areas of limited statehood. Trading routes and networks most often operate regionally and across borders, outside the control of national governments.

At international level several initiatives ranging from mandatory regulation to voluntary compliance have been developed in recent years to promote responsible sourcing of minerals from conflict affected and high-risk areas. Regional approaches have proven to be successful in fighting the illegal exploitation and trade of minerals providing the link between local, national and global levels and creating the political will of governments to cooperate and implement governance reforms. The workshop will draw on the experiences made by the two large GIZ regional resource governance projects in Africa in the Great Lakes and Mano River Union regions respectively.

Practical relevance for our governance services
In recent years, bi- and multilateral donors, international civil society organizations and businesses have increasingly engaged in supporting the development and implementation of approaches to promote responsible sourcing of minerals from conflict-affected and high-risk areas. Regional cooperation has emerged as a promising avenue to address the problem of the illegal exploitation and trade with mineral resources and promote responsible mineral sourcing. In this regard, the two large GIZ regional resource governance projects in Africa have developed innovative capacity building and advisory concepts. However, there remains scope for peer-learning and exchange to further improve our advisory services and discuss ways to best shape the broader international debate on mineral sector governance. In addition, partners in-country have made explicit request for assistance in this area.

Relevance for other projects
The illegal exploitation and trade of minerals is a global phenomenon occurring in conflict affected and high-risk areas in Africa, Latin America and Asia. Therefore, learning from successful regional approaches to promote responsible mineral sourcing in global supply chains is a topic most relevant for other GIZ projects (in the following areas: natural resource management, support to regional organizations, peace and security, rural development).

 

Return to Programme